Cooking Light

Oven Barbecue Beer-Can Chicken

This may be shocking to those who know I like to cook and have cooked for some time, but I’ve never really made more than one or two roaster chickens in my day.  Perhaps, I hesitate because I’m never quite sure if the chicken is done.  I know cookbooks say when the thermometer reaches a certain degree the meat is done, but I always have my Mom in my head saying, “Nobody likes dry meat!”  And when it comes to meat sadly many overcook it.

I’m proud to say this recipe came out pretty good.  I did trust my cooking time gut and pulled it a bit sooner than the recipe read and was glad I did.  The meat was delicious and the barbecue sauce went very well with it.  My other half said the sauce was a bit too spicy (and he likes hot/spicy things) and that’s why he gave the recipe four out of five stars.  We both decided it would be in our best interest if I made it again and tried other roaster recipes.

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INGREDIENTS

  • 1 (3 3/4-pound) whole roasting chicken (The smallest one I could find was 4.25 lbs.)
  • 3 tbsp ketchup
  • 3 tbsp chili sauce (I used sriracha)
  • 2 tsp Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 tsp chili powder
  • 1 tsp cider vinegar
  • 1/4 tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/8 tsp salt
  • 1 (12-oz) can beer (I used Modelo)
  • 3 tbsp barbecue smoked seasoning (such as Hickory Liquid Smoke)

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METHOD

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.  (Lower oven rack to the lowest shelf, and the recipe should have mentioned this.)
  2. Remove and discard the giblets and neck from chicken; trim excess fat.  Starting at neck cavity, loosen skin from breasts and drumsticks by inserting fingers, gently pushing between skin and meat.
  3. Combine ketchup, chili sauce, Worcestershire sauce, chili powder, vinegar, pepper, salt, and garlic.  Reserve 1/4 cup ketchup mixture for sauce, rub the remaining ketchup mixture under loosened skin and over breasts and drumsticks.  Lift wing tips up and over back, tuck under chicken.
  4. Discard 1/2 cup beer.  Add barbecue smoked seasoning to remaining beer in can.  Holding chicken upright with body cavity facing down, insert beer can into cavity.  Place chicken in a roasting pan, spread legs out to form a tripod to support the chicken.  Bake at 375 degrees for 40 minutes. (I increased my roasting time by 5 minutes because my roaster weighed more.)
  5. Increase oven temperature to 450 degrees; bake an additional 30 minutes or until a thermometer inserted in meat part of thigh registers 170 degrees. (After I increased the oven temperature the top of the chicken was becoming really crispy so I covered it with a small piece of tinfoil.  I also checked the roaster at 25 minutes and decided it was done, and the thermometer supported my decision and I probably could have taken it out sooner.)  Lift chicken slightly using tongs; place spatula under can.  Carefully lift chicken and can; place on a cutting board.  Let stand for 15 minutes.  Gently lift chicken using tongs or insulated rubber gloves.  Carefully twist can and remove from cavity; discard can.
  6. Remove skin from chicken, and discard.  Carve chicken; serve with the reserved 1/4 cup ketchup mixture.  Yield:  4 servings (serving size:  5 ounces meat and 1 tablespoon sauce.)

This recipe is from The Best of Cooking Light 8, Special Edition (2007)and can be found online here.

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Garlic Pork with Tomato and Basil

For a long time we ate a whole bunch of pork tenderloin in this house and then over time phased it out and only featured it occasionally.  Slowly, pork has been making a place in the weekly menu rotation again and this recipe gets better every time.

I really discovered this dish when reading, “Way to Cook – The  Complete Visual Guide to Everyday Cooking,” by Cooking Light.  I did grow up cooking watching my grandfather (Miss ya, Pops!), and my mother, but there are certain basic cooking techniques and knowledge I feel I still need to learn to improve my cooking.  Many assume because I love to cook I know more than I do and are surprised to find out I really had never made homemade mashed potatoes until a couple of years ago.  Shocking, I realize, but it’s just something I never got around to until that point.

I found this book in T.J. Maxx for next to nothing and it’s been pretty insightful.  For example, when I would cook with tomatoes normally I would just cut them up seeds and all and throw them in the dish.  Even if the recipe called for me to seed the tomato, I didn’t think it matttered.  Well, after making two batches of salsa this past summer and reading this book seeding a tomato really brings out the flavor of a tomato.

Besides the tomatoes, this recipe keeps it simple.  As you can see pork, tomatoes, green onions, and fresh basil are the main ingredients.  Sure, there’s some seasoning and cornstarch, but otherwise pretty simple.  I’ve always been a supporter of less is more.  We hope you enjoy this dish as much as we have, and now you have one more use for your upcoming summer tomatoes!  Ciao…

INGREDIENTS

  • 12 oz pork tenderloin, thinly sliced
  • 2 tsp cornstarch, divided
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • 1/8 freshly ground white pepper
  • 3 tbsp cold water
  • 2 tbsp oyster sauce
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 2 tsp Sriracha (hot chile sauce, such as Huy Fong)
  • 2 tsp peanut oil
  • 2 tsp minced fresh garlic
  • 2 cups chopped, seeded plum tomatoes (about 3 tomatoes)
  • ¾ cup chopped fresh basil
  • 2 green onions, cut into 1-inch pieces (about ¼ cup)
  • 2 cups hot cooked brown rice

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METHOD

  1. Combine pork, 1 tsp cornstarch, salt, and pepper in a small bowl, tossing to coat.
  2. Combine water, oyster sauce, sugar, Sriracha, and remaining 1 tsp cornstarch in a small bowl.
  3. Heat a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add oil, swirling to coat.  Add minced garlic and pork mixture; sauté 3 minutes or until pork is done.  Add chopped tomatoes, sauté 1 minute.  Add cornstarch mixture; cook 1 minute or until thickened.  Add basil; stir to combine.  Remove from heat, and sprinkle with onions.  Serve with brown rice.